Why You Need a Creative Side Project

Working in PR is not easy.

You have to be almost always on, prepared to deal with whatever each day brings.

Even though you love your job and don’t see yourself doing something else, it’s very easy to burnout.

Most of the times, burnout comes not from not liking what you do, but because you like it too much and therefore you don’t know when to disconnect.

Sounds familiar?

The good news is there are ways to deal with whatever your role in PR brings you.

Today I am going to focus on only one of them. But if you put it into practice and stick to it, you’ll find yourself having more energy, starting your day with more enthusiasm, and rediscovering the passion for your work.

Do I have your attention?

Here it is: You need a creative side project.

Yes, it’s that simple.

The Science Behind Having a Creative Side Project

Science shows that working on a side project boosts your work performance, makes you more productive, and increases your creativity.

But it doesn’t stop there. You’re more likely to be helpful and collaborative with your colleagues. And you’ll feel more relaxed and in control.

Who doesn’t want that?

I know, I do.

How to Find a Side Project that’s Right for You

Finding the side project that’s right for you, is not necessarily waking up one day and deciding to do this or that, though it could start that way too.

Most of the times, you need to take some time off, disconnect from your day-to-day life and reconnect with your inner self.

This sounds more complicated than it is.

Think about it this way: When you go on a hike, or go for a walk in nature, or find a place in your home where it’s quiet and you can think, you have the chance to reconnect with who you are.

Spend some time with yourself this weekend and find out what your passions are (not work related).

What did you want to do or be when you were little?

What is that thing or things you wanted to do, but couldn’t because life got in the way?

It can be traveling and seeing the world, learning to play the piano, eating healthy, painting, starting a book club, etc.

Write it or them, if you have more, down on a piece of paper.

Don’t stress about not having time, or that’s too complicated, or you’re too old, or whatever reason you give yourself not to do it.

Just write them down.

Now, pick one item from your list and imagine yourself doing it.

Imagine how it would be like to learn to play the piano, or travel the world, or start a book club, etc.

How does it make you feel?

Are you happy? Excited like a little kid in a candy store? Can’t wait to start?

Good!

That’s how you choose and start your own side project.

Where to Find the Time

We all live busy lives. Sometimes this is true, sometimes we like to complicate things, so we can be busy.

Whatever the reason, you can find more time in your day. You just have to want it bad enough and do some prioritization.

And before you give yourself a gazillion excuses, go back to how you felt when you imagined yourself starting your side project.

Now, take a look at what’s on your daily to-do list.

Determine what days and times would work best for you.

The goal is for you to be excited and look forward to those days, not to feel dread.

Next make a list of what you need to get started and gather those materials.

Set a goal that’s important enough for you to make it a priority.

Split your side project in small tasks that will make you look forward to that time of the day.

Keep in mind this is you having fun, so there should be no pressure to get this or that done because you’re on a deadline. You’re not.

Enjoy those moments when you’re working on your side project.

Notice the joy it brings you and notice how your happiness increases.

When you’re done with a particular side project, you can move on to the next.

The goal is for you to connect with yourself, to find your passions beyond work, to become more creative, happier, and a joyful person.

And if you need some inspiration, check out these cool side projects.

So, what’s you favorite side project?